Displaying posts tagged with

“Copyright”

Entertainment Contracts: Part Two–Clauses to Include

In my last blog article, I wrote about the basics of every contract. But there are a few other clauses that should be in every entertainment contract, although these are sometimes overlooked. Here is a brief (and I emphasize the word brief) description of some of those paragraphs that should be included. As always, for […]

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5 Myths About Copyright

In the olden days (before 1989), in order for a copyright to be in effect and remain effective, the author of the work was required to give notice to the public by putting a copyright notice on the work. No longer.

Copyright is effective as soon as the work is created. There is no requirement that the author put a notice of copyright on his or her work. There are advantages, however, to doing so. One is that it puts other people on notice that you are claiming the copyright

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Using Snippets of Music in Your Film

If your film is a documentary or news piece that comments on music (whether your comment is positive or negative), you may be entitled to use segments of the music to illustrate your point. If your film is a fiction narrative and the characters happen to be discussing a particular piece of music, whether that can be considered fair use is a bit more of a gray area.

United States Copyright law (in 17 U.S.C. § 107) contains a provision for “fair use of a copyrighted work” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, or research. This provision allows, among other things, journalists and critics to quote passages of a work in their reportage on that work.

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