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“Entertainment Agreements”

Entertainment Contracts: Part Two–Clauses to Include

In my last blog article, I wrote about the basics of every contract. But there are a few other clauses that should be in every entertainment contract, although these are sometimes overlooked. Here is a brief (and I emphasize the word brief) description of some of those paragraphs that should be included. As always, for […]

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Entertainment Contracts: Part One–the Basics

Form contracts, especially those in books, are not meant to be used by anyone. They are samples of fictitious ideal transactions which don’t exist. They’re meant to show the types of things that go into an agreement, but not necessarily your agreement.

Many of the agreements you get from friends were not written, or even reviewed, by an attorney. Most of them are not written correctly, do not make sense, and do not apply to your situation. They are passed from filmmaker to filmmaker and their errors are perpetuated or magnified if someone decides to make a “little” change in the wording. This article talks about the basics of what a good contract needs to contain.

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Options in the Motion Picture and Television Industries

In the financial industries, there are two broad types of options (which Black’s Law Dictionary defines generally as “the right of election to exercise a privilege.” One is the right to buy something in the future at a price you fix today, which Wall Street types term a “call.” The other broad category of option is the right to sell something in the future for a price you fix today, which financial investors term a “put.” There are variations on these two broad categories.

In motion pictures, it’s usually the first type people are talking about when they say “option.”

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Attachments to Screenplays

In simple terms, an attachment is someone (other than a writer) who has become involved with developing a screenplay to production and must be hired when production begins. When someone in the movie business says there is an attachment to a script, this is usually what they’re talking about. Usually, attachments are made because the script is good, but the writer is unable to get it to the “right people.” The “attachment agreement” can be a simple writing between the parties to record their mutual understanding of what is being promised.

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